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ESL Student Blog
Language points (vocabulary, grammar, pronunciaton) that are worth noticing for ESL students around the world.

Saturday, October 12, 2013

ESL Student Blog: Sugar-Free, Nut-Free, Gluten-Free - Talking About Dietary Restrictions

Most people go on a diet to lose weight and look and feel better.
 
A balanced diet is a diet that includes all 4 food groups: fruit and vegetables, dairy, meat and alternatives, and grains. Whole unprocessed foods (apples vs. apple juice, brown rice vs. white rice, whole-wheat bread vs. white bread etc.) are considered the most beneficial to our health.
 
But today many people also adopt a diet due to newly-diagnosed allergies and food intolerances; or, simply because they want to benefit animals and our planet. Yet some people are drawn to a diet just because it’s all the rage and/or followed by celebrities.
 
Here are some other common diets you might hear about in the media or your community:
 
- vegetarian (no meat/fish products consumed)
- vegan (no animal products consumed e.g.: no eggs, butter, honey etc.)

- raw (based on consuming raw plant-based foods that haven’t been heated above a certain temperature)

- Paleo (no grains, refined sugar, coffee, alcohol - a diet similar to what our ancestors ate many years ago)

- gluten-free (gluten is a protein found in some grains, especially wheat)

- allergy-free (avoiding common allergens: nuts, milk, soy, seafood, etc.)

- alkaline (mostly consuming alkaline foods vs. acidic to balance the body’s pH)
 
There are also Mediterranean, South Beach, Atkins, Weight Watches and probably dozens of others that include or rather exclude certain foods.
 
To argue for or against a diet or dieting in general, you can use the following words and expressions:
 
-whole foods
-processed/unprocessed foods
-minimally processed
-refined sugar
-a balanced/healthy/wholesome/plant-based diet
-anti-inflammatory diet
-heart-healthy
-nutrients: carbohydrates, fat, protein, vitamins, minerals
-nutrient-rich
-low-carb
-low-fat
-low-sodium
-low in saturated fat/trans fats
-high protein
simple/complex carbs (carbohydrates)
POSTED BY Olga Galperin AT 5:02 PM   0 Comments  Add Comment



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