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ESL Student Blog
Language points (vocabulary, grammar, pronunciaton) that are worth noticing for ESL students around the world.

Saturday, August 17, 2013

ESL Student Blog: American Pronunciation: Silent /T/ After /N/

Read the following sentence out loud:
 
There are plenty of international students at the University of Toronto.
 
How did you pronounce the words in bold? Did you sound out /t/ that follows /n/ in ‘plenty’, ‘international’ and ‘Toronto’?
 
While it’s completely acceptable to say ‘plenty’, ‘international’ and ‘Toronto’ the way they’re written, in more relaxed conversational situations (and very often in movies, radio programs, traffic and weather reports) the sound /t/ that follows /n/ after a stressed vowel is omitted.
 
In other words, if you want to give your conversational English a natural flow and make it sound smoother and more fluid, you might choose to drop the consonant sound /t/ after /n/ so that ‘plenty’ will become ‘plenny’, ‘international’ ‘innernational’ and ‘Toronto’ ‘Toronno’.  This happens because the sounds /n/ and /t/ are very close in the mouth which causes /t/ disappear.
 
Dropping /t/ after /n/ makes the overall rhythm of speech more natural and is quite common in American English. You don’t have to produce that pattern; however, must recognize it.
 
Below are some common words in which /t/ could be omitted:
 
Internet
interview
don’t know
twenty
centre
counter
advantage
identity
printer
winter
splinter
percentage
fantasy
antibiotic
centimeter
incentive
interaction
interval
dentist
painter
inventor
mentor
presenter
 
international
accidental
 
enter
entertain
disappointed
wanted
invented
presented
appointed
granted
acquainted
POSTED BY Olga Galperin AT 12:04 PM   0 Comments  Add Comment



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