email:
password:
sign up forgot password


It’s All in Your Heart: Idioms with the Word ‘Heart’

 
Level: ESL High-Intermediate
 
Objective: discuss the metaphorical uses of the word ‘heart’
 
Teacher Notes:
 
Write 2 sentences on the board:
 
(1) The doctor will now listen to to your heart.

(2) Just listen to your heart and study art, not medicine; even if your parents don’t approve of it.
 
Discuss the literal (1) and metaphorical (2) meaning of ‘listen to your heart’. In (2) the expression means ‘trust your heart because it can guide you and help make a right decision”.
 
Put students in pairs/small groups and have them discuss the questions below:
 
(1) Does your heart ever speak to you? What messages does it send? (warning, distress, caution, calmness, peacefulness). Do you take these messages seriously?
 
(2) When you have to make a decision, do you listen to your heart or brain? Do they sometimes contradict each other?
 
(3) In situations that are not health-related, when does you heart:
 
sing?

race?

feel heavy?

break?

pound?

skip a beat?

sink?

melt?

bleed for someone? (note 2 usages: My heart bleeds for the orphaned children (sympathy/sadness) vs. They say they can’t afford the third car - my heart bleeds for them. (humorous - I certainly don’t feel sadness about that)).

ache?

swell with pride?
 
(Think about being rejected/in love/scared/disappointed/excited/nervous/proud, feeling sympathy/sadness/uncertainty/admiration/stress/anxiety).
 
Hand out the worksheet. Students find a definition that best explains the meanings of the bolded idioms in Finding Definitions.
 
Wrap up with Conversation Questions.

Student Handout



Membership is required to see the rest of It’s All in Your Heart: Idioms with the Word ‘Heart’. Please click here to sign in or create an account.


Comments
Friday, February 24, 2012 AT 3:10 PM
Ahmed said:
Dogs lay? People lie? But that's not right. Dogs lie (for elmxpae, on a bed or on the ground) just as people lie (on a bed or on the ground). I'm not an ESL teacher, but my professional life is based on a good working knowledge of the language. (I'm a writer, editor and publisher.)When is "lay" appropriate? It's correct to say a person lays a book on a table. But after he does that, then the book is *lying* on the table. Same with a dog. A dog could lay a book on the table. Then the book lies on the table.When a dog or a person is asleep in his bed, he is lying in bed. When a book is reclining on a shelf, the book is lying on the shelf. (When a person, or even a dog, places a book on the shelf, he lays the book on the shelf. Then the book is lying on the shelf -- just like a book, if it could fall asleep, might be lying on a bed.)That bit about dogs laying and people lying is pure confusion. It's lie, lay, lain (reclining, whether you're a dog, person or book) and lay, laid, laid (placing something or someone -- whether it be a book, dog or person -- somewhere). --DC

Sunday, July 08, 2012 AT 1:09 PM
Benjamart Dechsiri said:
THANK YOU

  Name (required)   
  Mail (required)(will not be published)    
   
Type the characters you see in the picture



CAPTCHA Code Image
 



Download



ESL Worksheet It’s All in Your Heart Idioms with the Word Heart.pdf
(2978KB)

ESL Student Blog | ESL Teacher Blog | About Us | Contact Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement